Power, Privilege, Politics

There are 32 posts in this category

Cold indifference – new normal for community services?

December 6th, 2019   

“I’ve seen a lot in my thirty plus years as a social worker, and have some scars to show for it,” writes Dr Lorraine Harrison in this guest post for 2020socialjustice.
Lorraine refers to the “cold indifference” of funding-driven organisations in community services in which “the number of clients who pass through the service seems more important than whether they are helped” and workers are treated as “dispensable human resources”.

Read the whole post »

 

New Hope for Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse?

August 30th, 2019   

“I have a voice, and I intend to use it,” writes Keith Thomas Davis, Survivor of childhood sexual abuse within the Catholic Church.
“My initial experience with my claim drove me to the edge. They will not do that to me again. I have recently found out I have a new avenue of appeal and I will not be silent. That would be a disservice to myself, to other Survivors, and to those who could no longer bear the pain, and are no longer with us…My heart and resolve beats strongly for them.”
(Many thanks, Keith, for this guest post for 2020socialjustice. May your voice resound in all the corners it needs to reach…Joan Beckwith.)

Read the whole post »

 

Why wouldn’t we have Jacinda-envy?

May 9th, 2019   

Of course we have Jacinda-envy. Why wouldn’t we? When you look at the prime ministerial revolving door in Australia over recent years. Tony Abbott, Malcolm Turnbull and Scott Morrison, with Peter Dutton lurking in the wings, provide miserable substitutes for Jacinda Ardern, prime minister of New Zealand.

Read the whole post »

 

Hovering over the opt-out button on “My Health Record”

October 11th, 2018   

It’s a lifesaver, so the politicians say, spruiking My Health Record (MHR), the centralised electronic health database. I have my doubts, and this webpost burrows below the political spin. My number one critic says it should come with a TLDR alert (at 4896 words), but I’m hoping you stay with me, consider your options, and add your comments.

Read the whole post »

 

In defence of universities…under fire from left and right

March 24th, 2018   

Universities are under fire from both sides of politics. The right complain they fail to meet the needs of employers. The left argue they legitimise the ‘meritocracy’ and hence fuel inequality. Both arguments can be co-opted by governments intent on cutting funds. In this post, I respond in defence of universities.

Read the whole post »

 

Caring (for the bottom line) in residential aged care

October 20th, 2017   

It makes bloodcurdling reading, the series of articles by Fairfax Media on residential aged care in Australia.
And, it’s not just about ‘a few bad apples’.
Residential aged care is big business, profits take precedence over care, the accreditation system eclipses neglect and abuses, the complaints process is ineffectual, and the market myth camouflages the cracks.
This post expands these points, drawing on the articles.

Read the whole post »

 

Spirit-Sickness and Values through an Atheist’s Lens

September 1st, 2017   

As an atheist who believes in spirit-sickness, and the importance of strong values, I find myself having interesting conversations about how that can be. What does it mean to believe in the spirit if you don’t believe in God, one friend asked. How can disbelievers suffer spirit-sickness? Where do values come from in the absence of a received framework (such as can, for example, be provided by religion)?
I’m interested in other people’s experiences and moral journeys.

Read the whole post »

 

Getting angry (or not) about abuse, injustice, illness

July 22nd, 2017   

I get angry about abuse and injustice, but (so far at least) not so much about my own illness. Friends are surprised by my apparent complacence. I’ve been surprised by their surprise, intrigued by my own inconsistencies, and curious about triggers for other people’s anger.

Read the whole post »

 

No excuses for “crimes of the father”

May 19th, 2017   

There are no excuses for child abuse, and Tom Keneally makes none in his novel about pedophilia in the Catholic Church. Keneally’s insights into the perpetrator mindset are disturbing and he also illustrates why it was never going to work for the Church to investigate itself. His narrative seems a plausible fit with reality, although views on this may differ depending on personal experience.

Read the whole post »

 

Wealth Inequality – from Daniel Blake to Robo Debt

April 28th, 2017   

I recently watched “I, Daniel Blake” and “The Founder” in a single viewing, immersed in the story of wealth inequality unfolding between their extremes. These films, closer to fact than politicians care to admit, reflect the lived reality of punitive welfare systems on the one hand, and unfettered plutocracy on the other. They have close parallels in current Australian society.

Read the whole post »

 

Show the 'Share' buttons
Hide Buttons