Welcome to 2020SocialJustice

If you care about social inequity, you are in the right place.

This site has posts about asylum seekers, race and racism, gender and sexuality, bullying and abuse of power, mental health and disability, lifestage issues and suicide, poverty, power and privilege, as well as general ideas about social justice.

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Note: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are advised that this site may include images and other references to people who have passed away. It may also contain links to sites that may use images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased.

 

Most recent ...

Getting angry (or not) about abuse, injustice, illness

July 22nd, 2017   

I get angry about abuse and injustice, but (so far at least) not so much about my own illness. Friends are surprised by my apparent complacence. I’ve been surprised by their surprise, intrigued by my own inconsistencies, and curious about triggers for other people’s anger.

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Who am ‘I’? What is ‘me’? In sickness, health, and (near)death?

June 23rd, 2017   

‘I’ have hope and passion and belief in social justice. The embodied ‘me’ too often feels defeated, especially when my body is behaving badly. This separation of ‘I’ and ‘me’ is not an everyday occurrence, and I wonder about other people’s experiences.

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No excuses for “crimes of the father”

May 19th, 2017   

There are no excuses for child abuse, and Tom Keneally makes none in his novel about pedophilia in the Catholic Church. Keneally’s insights into the perpetrator mindset are disturbing and he also illustrates why it was never going to work for the Church to investigate itself. His narrative seems a plauible fit with reality, although views on this may differ depending on personal experience.

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Wealth Inequality – from Daniel Blake to Robo Debt

April 28th, 2017   

I recently watched “I, Daniel Blake” and “The Founder” in a single viewing, Immersed in the story of wealth inequality unfolding between their extremes. These films, closer to fact than politicians care to admit, reflect the lived reality of punitive welfare systems on the one hand, and unfettered plutocracy on the other. They have close parallels in current Australian society.

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Social justice student award fails university obstacle course

April 9th, 2017   

It seemed like a good idea at the time. A perpetual student award, for an essay related to social justice. The academic aspects were straightforward to organise, but the administrative aspects were not. Lack of overall coordination across these two arms of the university created a barrier to sustainability. The endowment has now been transferred into one-off Study Support Scholarships.

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What role for ridicule in resistance movements?

March 17th, 2017   

Ridicule works, the meme claims. But to achieve what, I wonder, raising seven questions about the effects (and effectiveness) of ridicule when the aim is non-violent resistance against abusive forms of power.

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As my friend lies dying…it’s not black and white

January 12th, 2017   

“I support euthanasia,” I would have said, without hesitation, until recently. That was before my friend, Eva, begged me to help her to die. What a huge thing it would be, I now realise, to decide the timing of another person’s death – even if it was legal, which in Australia it currently is not. Eva is now in palliative care, alive but with no life. Palliation is no panacea either, I have learned, and nothing about dying is black and white.

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Slow clap for part-time work

October 14th, 2016   

“I am not going to demonise part-time employment. I’m going to support it and applaud it,” (Minister for Employment). This applause was greeted with a slow clap – by underemployed workers and those who empathise with their position. Here I collate some responses, which I also sent to Canberra for the minister’s comment.

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No harder than when she came out as vegetarian!

September 23rd, 2016   

“How was it for you when your daughter came out as lesbian?” my friend asked. I was a little taken aback by the question (my daughter having been out for years) but did my best to recall some memories. Really, I summed up in the end, it was less of an adjustment for me than when she became vegetarian.

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Eating like a refugee – for a week

August 26th, 2016   

“Eat the same rations as a Syrian refugee”, the advertisement invited.
“I did,” writes Nicole Soorkia, guest blogger for 2020socialjustice, “for a week. It was hard, but not nearly as hard as it would be if it was every week. I’m humbled and grateful for this glimpse into part of a refugee’s life, and here are my notes from each day.”

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